Networks

Visualizing Contagious Twitter Memes with NodeXL and Gephi

In the last post we explored how to use NodeXL to collect a Twitter user's network data. Now, I'll describe how to collect data on a trending topic.

To get started, follow steps 0 and 1 here to setup a Twitter account and download the NodeXL software. Then, to download the network data, click on Import and select From Twitter Search Network… In the first dialog box, enter the search term that you want to look for. Any account that recently posted a tweet containing this phrase will end up being a node in your network.  In the book, "Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL," there is some good advice on choosing an appropriate trending topic to look at:

"First, the search phrase has to concern a recent event. Though Twitter has been around for several years, the volume of information being produced every second is so huge that the search interface has limits on how many tweets it will return for a given query, or how old tweets can be. Searching for "2008 Election" may in theory produce a valuable set of tweets about the election cycle, but in practice those tweets are too far back in time for the search interface to collect them efficiently. The second criterion is that the search phrase has to relate to a piece of news, promotion, event, and so on that is u contagious" (i.e., Twitter users who see the message will, at least in principle, want to pass it on to their followers). A search phrase like "Thanksgiving" is a trending topic on Twitter (shortly before and on Thanksgiving) but lacks a contagious property-there is no need to pass on the message because a large fraction of the population already knows about it, so tweets about Thanksgiving are independent events rather than the sign of a "Thanksgiving meme" spreading throughout the Twitter population."

One good way to do this is look through the recent tweets of a popular user for something that you think would be sufficiently interesting that other people would retweet the message. For example, in the network below, I gathered data on tweets containing the phrase "Who Googled You?" This Twitter meme originated with Pete Cashmore, of @mashable, and links to a Mashable article that describes a way to find out who has been searching for you on Google. The article generated a flurry of interest and many other people tweeted links to the article, generally repeating the original article title, "Who Googled You?" Since this meme spread from person to person, it was a good candidate for visualizing as a Twitter search network. Untitled

You can select what relationships you want to use to define the edges of your network by selecting any combination of the following choices:

Follows relationship — two accounts are connected if one account follows the other.
"Replies-to" relationship in tweet — two accounts are connected if one account replies to the other in its tweet.
"Mentions" relationship in tweet — two accounts are connected if one account mentions the other account in its tweet.

As discussed in the previous post, because of Twitter rate limits, it is advisable to limit your request to a fixed number of people. Unless you are especially patient, I recommend starting with just 300 people.

Once you download the data using NodeXL, I like to export it as a graphml file and then visualize it in Gephi. In this example, I did a few things to make the visualization more meaningful, which I describe below.

Before getting started with manipulating the network in Gephi, it is a good idea to go into the Data Laboratory and delete some of the columns that NodeXL created. You should delete anything having to do with the color or size of the nodes or edges, or centrality measures such as PageRank and eigenvector centrality. These columns are generally empty, but unless you delete them, Gephi won't overwrite them when you ask it to calculate these measures, so you won't be able to calculate and make use of them in your analysis. For some general tips on using Gephi, check out the FAQ here.

First, I filtered out all of the accounts except those that belong to the largest connected component of the network. This makes the network much more readable, and allows us to focus only on those nodes involved in a large cascade. After trying a few options, I choose the Force Atlas layout algorithm to arrange the nodes. For Twitter networks, I have found Force Atlas to generally give the best layout. Usually, I have to increase the repulsion strength from the default setting of 200 to 2000 or more. Then I resized the nodes according to their degree so we can get a sense for who the most important nodes in the network are. I also tried sizing the nodes by PageRank and eigenvector centrality for comparison. For the most part these different centrality measures didn't make much difference, although one account, @darrenmcd, appears significantly more important according to PageRank or Eigenvector centrality than degree centrality. The Twitter accounts @briansois and @armano standout as the most influential in the network. I colored the nodes according to which community they belong to as identified using Gephi's implementation of the Girvan-Newman modularity based clustering algorithm, and I colored the edges according to the type of relationship between the Twitter accounts. Blue edges are "followed" relationships, green edges are "mentions" and purple edges are "replies to." We can see that almost all of the links to @armano mention the relationship explicitly, and about half of those to @briansois do.

WhoGoogledYou

Collecting and Visualizing Twitter Network Data with NodeXl and Gephi

NodeXL is a freely available Excel template that makes it super easier to collect Twitter network data. Once you have the Twitter network data, you can visualize the network with Gephi. Here's how to do it.

Step 0: Start a Twitter account

If you don’t have a Twitter account, the first thing you need to do is go to https://twitter.com/ and start one. Besides the fact that having an account will make getting data faster, it’s good for you to have a little Twitter experience before you dive into the exercise. Once you’ve started an account, you’ll want to follow some people. Here are few suggestions to get you started:
@pjlamberson — of course
@KelloggSchool — self explanatory
@gephi — you know you’re a social dynamics dork when ... you follow @gephi on Twitter
@James_H_Fowler — professor of political science at UCSD and author of seminal studies of social contagion in social networks
@noshir — Noshir Contractor, Northwestern network scientist
@erikbryn — Sloan prof. with lot’s of stuff on economics of information
@jeffely — Northwestern economics / Kellogg prof. and blogger: http://cheaptalk.org/
@RepRules — Kellogg prof. Daniel Diermeier
@sinanaral — Stern prof. who did the active/passive viral marketing study and other cool network research
@duncanjwatts — Duncan Watts research scientist and Yahoo, big time social networks scholar
@ladamic — Michigan prof. who did the viral marketing study and made the political blogs network

And don’t forget to post a tweet! If you are a serious Twitter beginner, check out Twitter 101.

Step 1: Getting the Software

We will be using the software NodeXL to gather the data from Twitter. Besides downloading the data, you can also use NodeXL to visualize and analyze network data, but I prefer to export the data and use another program like Gephi to do the visualization and analysis. NodeXL is an Excel template, but it unfortunately only runs on Excel for Windows. You can download it at: http://nodexl.codeplex.com/ Once you have downloaded and installed the software, open it up by selecting NodeXL Excel Template in the NodeXL folder under All Programs.

Once the program is open, select the NodeXL ribbon.

Step 2: Getting the Data

Now we want to get some Twitter network data. We’re going to collect data on people that follow a person, company, or product, or if you want you can use yourself (this will only be interesting if you have a healthy Twitter presence).

Click on Import and select From Twitter User’s Network. You’ll want to authorize NodeXL to access your Twitter account by selecting the radio button at the bottom and following the onscreen instructions. Once your account is authorized, you should find a company or product on Twitter that you’re interested in (you can do this inside Twitter via a browser). Enter that Twitter username in the dialog box labeled "Get the Twitter network of the user with this username:" For example, if you wanted to collect data on my Twitter account (@pjlamberson) you would enter "pjlamberson" (you don't need the @). For the remaining choices in the pop-up window, select the following options:

Add a vertex for each: Both
Add an edge for each: Followed/following relationship
Levels to include: 1.5
Limit to XXX people — This is a key variable to set and really depends on your level of patience (see Warning: Twitter Rate Limiting below). If this is your first time, I suggest limiting to 200 people. With Twitter's new rate limits, even 200 people will take several hours to collect.

Click OK and wait for the data to download. This may take a while. Be sure that computer is set so that it does not go to sleep during the data collection.

Warning: Twitter Rate Limiting

Twitter limits the number of times per hour fifteen minutes that you can query the API (Application Programming Interface). You may be tempted to request more data — for example the level 2.0 network — or request one set, change your mind and request another etc... This can quickly put you up against the rate limit and you will have to wait an hour before any more data can be downloaded. NodeXL will automatically pause when you reach the Twitter rate limit and wait for an hour to begin downloading data again. If you have time to let your computer run all night (or for several days), then you can increase the limit to more people. However, if you do this you should set your computer so that it does not go to sleep.

Step 3: Exporting the Data

Once you have the data, you can either analyze it within NodeXL or export it to analyze using another program. For example, if you want to analyze the data using Gephi, click on Export and choose the GraphML format. This will create a file that Gephi can open.

Step 4: Visualizing and Analyzing the Network with Gephi

Now that we have the data, we want to create a visualization in Gephi. To open the network data in Gephi, just choose Open from the File menu and select the file that you exported from NodeXL. Initially the network will be a bit of a mess.

To get a better (and more useful) picture we will do four things — size the nodes by eigenvector centrality, color the nodes using a network community finding algorithm, add labels, and change the layout.

Sizing the nodes by Eigenvector Centrality

Eigenvector centrality is one measure of how important a node in a network is (network scientists use the word "centrality" to mean network importance). The simplest measure of centrality is degree centrality: the degree centrality of a node is the number of links that connect to that node divided by the number of nodes in the network minus one (we divide by n-1 because this is the maximum number of connections any node can have and thus rescales degree centrality to lie between 0 and 1). Eigenvector centrality not only takes into account the number of connections a given node has (its degree) but also the "importance" of the nodes on the other ends of those connections.

To size the nodes by eigenvector centrality, we first have to calculate the eigenvector centrality for all of the nodes. One minor annoyance is that NodeXL created an empty column for eigenvector centrality and until we delete that column, Gephi won't be able to do the calculation. To get rid of this column, click on the Data Laboratory tab at the top of Gephi. This will take you to a spreadsheet view of the network data. At the bottom of the window you will see a series of buttons that allow you to manipulate this spreadsheet. Click the "Delete Column" button and choose "Eigenvector Centrality." Now, go back to the Overview view by clicking Overview at the top left of the window. In the Statistics panel, click the Run button next to Eigenvector Centrality (if the Statistics panel is not showing, select it under the Window menu). Click Ok from the pop window that appears. A graph should appear showing the distribution of eigenvector centrality across the nodes in your network. You can just close this window.

Then go to the Ranking panel and select the symbol that looks like a little red diamond (this symbol is used to mean size in Gephi, I have no idea why). From the drop down menu that says "---Choose a rank parameter" select "Eigenvector Centrality." You can adjust the Min/Max size range for the nodes (I use 10 and 50) and then click the Apply button.

The nodes should now be resized so that the largest nodes have the highest eigenvector centrality.

Coloring the Nodes with a Community Finding Algorithm

One of the most interesting things you can look at in a Twitter network are different communities of Twitter accounts. We're going to use a "Modularity based community finding algorithm" to group the network nodes so that the groups have lots of connections within the groups but relatively few between groups.

The first step is to hit the Run button next to Modularity in the Statistics pane. Click OK on the pop-up window and then close the distribution graph that appears. Now, go to the Partition window and hit the refresh button (it looks like two little green arrows pointing in a circle). Choose "Modularity Class" from the "---Choose a partition parameter" drop down menu. Notice that there are several other ways that you can group the nodes (e.g. by time zone) that you may want to come back and explore later. Gephi will show you the different communities it has identified along with the percentage of nodes that belong to each of those communities. For example, Gephi split my Twitter network into four communities. The largest community consist of 38.54% of the nodes and the smallest community contains 18.94% of the nodes.

If you click the Apple button, Gephi will color the communities in the network. If you want to change the colors, just click on the color square in the Partition window. Here's what my network looks like now:

Adding Labels

The next step is to add labels to our network so that we can identify different accounts. This will help us to understand who the important nodes in our network are and what ties together the nodes within the different communities. To show the labels, click the black T at the bottom of the Graph pane. You can resize the labels with the right slider at the bottom of the graph pane. At the moment you probably will have a hard time reading the labels because they overlap one another, but we will fix that in a second.

Using a layout algorithm to rearrange the nodes

To reposition the nodes into a more useful arrangement we will use one of Gephi's built-in layout algorithms. I find that the Force Atlas algorithm works well for Twitter network, but you should play around with the other algorithms as well to find one that works best for the particular network that you have collected. You can select the algorithm from the drop down menu in the Layout pane, and try changing the various layout specific parameters to see what works best. Here's what I'm using:

Hit the Run button to run the algorithm. If your network has a lot of nodes/links (or if your computer is slow), it may take awhile for the algorithm to move them around. Once you've found a nice arrangement, use the "Label Adjust" layout algorithm to move the nodes so that the labels don't cover one another up. Here's what i have now:

The only thing left to do is go over to the Preview window where Gephi will render a nice image for you once you click the Refresh button. You can make final adjustments such as hiding/showing labels and adjusting the label sizes in the Preview Settings Pane. You may have to iterate back and forth a bit between the Overview layout and the Preview to get everything just right.

Here's my finished product:

Of Monsters and Men — How an Icelandic Band Exploded using the Web

Bo Olafsson, a Kellogg student that took Social Dynamics and Networks with me this past fall quarter, put together a nice slideshow explaining how a little known Icelandic band, Of Monsters and Men, became a huge US success without ever visiting the country. Check it out:

Interestingly, Bo's slides have become a mini viral phenomenon themselves garnering press attention in both Iceland and the US:

What it takes to "Go Viral"

It seems like we hear a new story every week: a video, or a rumor, or a song, or a commercial has "gone viral," spreading across the web like wildfire, racing to the top of the most tweeted list, and grabbing headlines in real old fashioned news media. These memes can be disgusting (like the Domino's pizza video), controversial (like the recent Kony 2012 video), and entertaining ("Friday" ?). They can be disasters for companies (see Domino's above), or marketing campaigns that reach hundreds of thousand, or even millions, of viewers for relatively little investment (1300 foot drop, the Old Spice Guy). Given the potential impact of these "memes," there is a lot of interest in what exactly determines whether or not a video, or a message, or a rumor goes viral. Here's a simple model that explains why some things do and some things don't.

Let's consider the example of a YouTube video. Suppose that on average, every person that views the video tells of their friends about it per day (stands for contacts), and suppose that some fraction of the people that hear about the video actually watch it and start telling other people about it themselves (i stands for infectivity, and captures something like how interesting the video is.) Finally, suppose that on average, each person that is actively spreading word of the video does so for d days before they get bored and stop telling people about the video (d stands for duration).

To keep things simple, suppose that there are a total of N people in the population, and every one of these people is either actively spreading the video, or not actively spreading the video, but susceptible to becoming a video spreader. Let I denote the number of people currently spreading (i.e. infected) and S the number of people that are susceptible, but not currently spreading the video. So, I+S=N.

To see if the video goes viral or not, we just have to compare the rate at which people are becoming infected to the rate at which people are discontinuing sharing the video. It helps to think of a bath tub — the level of water in the bath tub represents the number of people spreading the video. The rate that water flows in through the faucet is the rate at which new people are becoming infected with the video spreading virus; the rate at which water drains out is the rate at which people are stopping spreading the video. If the rate at which water flows in is higher than the rate at which it drains out, the tub will keep filling up. On the other hand, if the drain is more open than the faucet, the bath tub will never fill up.

So, we have to figure out the rate at which new people are starting to spread the video and the rate at which people currently sharing the video are stopping. The second one is easier. If I people are currently sharing the video and each one of them shares it for d days on average, then each day we expect I/D people to stop spreading the video. For the first rate, we have I people actively sharing the video. On average, each one of them shares the video with c contacts per day, resulting in a total of cI contacts for the whole population. But, not all of these contacts results in a new person sharing the video. First, some of these people will already be sharing the video. The probability that a given person is not currently sharing the video is S/N, the fraction of "susceptible" people in the population. So, we expect cIS/N instances in which a person shares the video with someone that is currently spreading the video. Given such a contact, we said that a fraction i of these will result in a new person sharing the video. Putting it all together, the rate at which new people are becoming infected with the video sharing virus is ciIS/N.

Now we have to compare our two rates. The video will go viral if ciIS/N>I/d. Dividing both sides by I and multiplying both sides by d, this becomes, cidS/N>1. Finally, we can make life a little simpler by assuming that initially almost no one knows about the video, so the number of susceptible people S and the total population N are about the same. Then S/N is approximately 1, so the equation simplifies to just cid>1.

This simple equation tells us whether or not the video will go viral. It says if the average number of contacts, times the infectivity, times the duration is greater than one, the video will spread, otherwise it will die out. Right at cid=1 there is a tipping point; crossing this threshold causes a discontinuous jump in the future.

This model makes a lot of assumptions that don't really hold (big ones are that people have roughly the same # of contacts on average, and the people basically interact at random), but it gives us a basic understanding of the process. Even in more complicated models, where we make fewer simplifying assumptions, there is typically a similar tipping point, and increasing either contacts, infectivity, or duration increases the chance of crossing that threshold.

So, there you have it — everything you need to go viral: a network with enough contacts (c); a product, or message, that sounds interesting enough to be infectious (i), and with enough staying power so that people keep telling their friends about it for a long time (d).

Social Dynamics Videos

While I've been teaching Social Dynamics and Networks at Kellogg, I've amassed a collection of links to interesting videos on social dynamics. Here they are:

Duncan Watts TEDx talk on "The Myth of Common Sense"

Nicholas Christakis TED talk on "The hidden influence of social networks"; TED talk on "How social networks predict epidemics."

James Fowler talking about social influence on the Colbert Report.

Sinan Aral TEDx talk on "Social contagion"; at PopTech 2010 on "Social contagion"; at Nextwork on "Social contagion"; at the International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media on "Content and causality in social networks."

Scott E. Page on "Leveraging Diversity", and at TEDxUofM on "Putting Milk Crates on the Internet."

Eli Pariser TED talk on "Beware online 'filter bubbles'"

Freakonomics podcast on "The Folly of Prediction"

Damon Centola on "Network Contagion."

Jure Leskovec on "The Web as a Laboratory for Studying Humanity"

There are several good videos of talks from the Web Science Meets Network Science conference at Northwestern: Duncan Watts, Albert-Laszlo Barabasi, Jure Leskovec, and Sinan Aral.

The "Did You Know?" series of videos has some incredible information about, well, information. More info here.

Clustering and the Ignorance of Crowds

Over on the Cheap Talk blog (@CheapTalkBlog), Jeff Ely (@jeffely) has an interesting post about the "Ignorance of Crowds." The basic idea is that when there are lots of connections among people, each individual has less incentive to seek out costly information — e.g. subscribe to the newspaper — on their own, because instead they can just get that information ("free ride") from others. More connections means more free riding and fewer informed individuals.

I take a much more complicated route to the same conclusion in "Network Games with Local Correlation and Clustering." Besides being sufficiently mathematically intractable to, hopefully, be published, the paper does show a few other things too. In particular, I look at how network clustering affects "public goods provision," which is the fancy term for what Jeff Ely calls subscribing to the newspaper. Lots of real social networks are highly clustered. This means that if I'm friends with Jack and Jill, there is a good chance that Jack and Jill are friends with each other. What I find in the paper is that clustering increases public goods provision. In other words, when people are members of tight knit communities, more people should subscribe to the newspaper (and volunteer, and pick up trash, and ...)

It's pretty clear that the Internet, social media etc... are increasing the number of contacts that we have, but an interesting question that I haven't seen any research on is How are these technologies affecting clustering (if at all)?

A Gephi Visualization of Gephi on Twitter

This is a visualization of Twitter accounts that follow and are followed by @gephi that I made using ... Gephi. I collected the data using NodeXL. Two accounts are linked in the network if one follows the other on Twitter. Nodes are sized according to their degree. The modularity clustering algorithm finds 8 different groups among the accounts.  The blue group in the upper left, where I live, contains most of the network science crowd: @duncanjwatts, @ladadimc, @barabasi, @davidlazer, etc... The green group in the lower right seem to be data/visualization folks. I filtered out all of the nodes with degree less than four, before which there is a large contingent of accounts that followed @gephi, but with no other connections in the network.

Why Google Ripples will be a lot less cool than it sounds.

Google + now has a new feature, Ripples, that allows you to see a network visualization of the diffusion of a post (see the Gizmodo article here).  The pictures are cool, but the original post has to be public, and then it has to be shared by one Google+ user to other Google+ users.  But, the chance of interesting ripples happening very often are pretty slim; here's why.

Bakshy, Hofman, Mason, and Watts looked at exactly this kind of cascade on Twitter, which is a great platform for this kind of research for several reasons.  First, everything is effectively public, so there are none of the privacy issues of Facebook, and we don't have to limit ourselves to looking at just the messages that people choose to make public like we do on Google +.  Second, "retweeting" messages is an established part of Twitter culture, so we expect to find cascades. Finally, since tweets are limited to 140 characters, links are often shortened using services like bit.ly.  This means that if I create a link to a New York Times article and you create a link to the same page independently, those links will be different, so the researchers can tell the difference between a cascade that my post creates and one that yours creates.

Some of the cascades that Bakshy et al. found are shown in this figure.

They looked at 74 million chains like these initiated by more than 1.6 million Twitter users during two months in 2009.  A lot of interesting things came out of the study, but the most important one for Google Ripples is that 98 percent of the URLs were never reposted.  That's not good for Ripples.  The latest number puts the entire Google plus user population at only 43.6 million users, and since only a small fraction of these users' posts will be public posts, even if people share other people's posts on Google+ as frequently as the retweet links on Twitter (which is unlikely), we still can't expect to see many Ripples that look like anything but a lonely circle.

Visualizing Your Facebook Network with Gephi

This is a visualization of my own Facebook network that I made using the (free) software Gephi and the Facebook application netvizz.  Each node in the network is one of my Facebook friends, and two friends are connected to one another if they are Facebook friends with each other.  The size of the node corresponds to the "degree" of the node, which means how many connections it has.  In this case, that means how many of my Facebook friends that person is Facebook friends with.  (Note: I deleted the names from the nodes to protect my Facebook friends' privacy).

The colors of the nodes indicate communities of friends found using a clustering algorithm based on the "modularity" of the network.  Basically what the algorithm does is try to group the nodes into communities with lots of connections within each community and not too many connection between the communities.  Even though the algorithm doesn't know anything about my friends, other than the web of connections (it doesn't even know they're people), it does a good job of picking identifying groups of my friends that belong to the same communities in real life.  For example the purple cluster in the upper right are people I know from graduate school, the little green cluster in the lower right are people from the Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems.  The big bunch in the middle are people I know from high school, with the people from the band (or band groupies) in green on the right side.  My wife is the purple node that bridges the gap between my graduate school friends and my huh school friends.

We did this as an exercise in the Social Dynamics and Networks course that I teach at Kellogg.  If you want to see how you can map your network, you can find instructions on my Kellogg website here.

Detecting Illicit Activity by Examining Communication Network Structure

This article from The Atlantic's website describes some fascinating research by Brandy Aven at CMU's Tepper School that demonstrates how communication networks discussing illicit activity differ from those discussing routine matters by examining the Enron email archives. It's a great example of how the structure of a network can reveal information about the process that generated it.